Nanor Kebranian

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Dr. Kebranian (B.A., Comparative Literature and Philosophy, Fordham University, 1998 – 2002; DPhil, Oxford University, 2005 - 2010) specializes in late Ottoman social, political, and cultural history and literary studies. She completed her doctoral dissertation with the generous support of both the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation Graduate Fellowship and the Oxford University Clarendon Fellowship. Areas of interest include the late Ottoman Empire; the modern Middle East; philosophy of religion; religion and literature; diaspora narratives and culture; the ethics of representation; and critiques of community.
Current projects include a book monograph, tentatively entitled, Contested Convictions. The work presents conceptions and representations of late Ottoman (1878 – 1915) inter-communal coexistence through narratives of political imprisonment. Future book projects include a study of late Ottoman conversion narratives and a literary-philosophical presentation of “Diaspora” as an anti-communal ethic.
She teaches Text and Territory; Witness: The Ethics and Aesthetics of Representation; Hagop Oshagan: Prison to Prison; Asian Humanities: Middle East/India; Introduction to Western Armenian Literature; Early Armenian Literature: The 5th century; and Literature and Humanities.
Nanor Kebranian
Nanor Kebranian
Assistant Professor